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Growth Fetish: Five Reasons Why Prioritizing Growth Is Bad Policy

Growth Fetish: Five Reasons Why Prioritizing Growth Is Bad Policy

Gus Speth

Gus Speth

Co-chair of The Next System Project more

Environment & Energy Democracy & Governance

Economic growth is good and the world needs more of it. Or does it? In this piece for CommonDreams, distinguished fellow and co-chair of the Next System Project Gus Speth, debunks America’s growth imperative by laying out five unmistakable problems with the obsession for economic growth. By describing these problems in detail, Speth gives illustration to the damages of the current system and discusses the need for a new economy.

One hears a lot about reviving the economy and getting it growing again. But shouldn’t we be striving to transform the economy and not merely revive it? The old economy simply hasn’t been delivering economically, socially or environmentally for decades.

Read the full article at CommonDreams.

Gus Speth

Gus Speth

Co-chair of The Next System Project more

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