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Searching for Radicalism in a Corporate Age

Gus Speth

Gus Speth

Co-chair of The Next System Project more

Movement Strategy & History

In this article for the Tellus Institute, distinguished fellow and co-chair of the Next System Project Gus Speth takes a close look at the triumphs and pitfalls of the book Protest Inc: The Corporatization of Activism. Speth details the book’s foundational ideas about activism and the headwinds pushing against the rise of current radical activism. He notes where authors Peter Dauvergne and Genevieve LeBaron make strong arguments to back their opinions and where they fall short on the future of activism.

As national and international challenges mount across the full spectrum of human affairs, and as more and more acute observers conclude that the problems we face trace back one way or another to our system of political economy—the corporatist, consumerist capitalism that we have today—it is timely to ask, where is the activism that might change the system?

Read the full article at the Tellus Institute.

Gus Speth

Gus Speth

Co-chair of The Next System Project more

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